Papworth Everard Hospital

Urgent Transfer to Papworth Hospital – Aug 16th 2015

Dads daily diaries and Admission to critical care and Papworth Hospital transfer

Dads Diary notes from 13th August 2015.

“So, Jess, today you have been struggling to breathe properly, the ventilator doesn’t sound right and they have changed the device once today. Your chest is rising rapidly and to seem to be panting for air. It is horrible to watch and me and your Mum have asked why the sound is so different from the machine today”

Jessica Rae Rudland CCU Papworth HospitalToday we have been told you have Sepsis, kidney and liver failure. I think they said Hyperkalemia and mentioned acid levels and potassium indicators were high. We have written it all in your diary page so we can remember.

They also mentioned infection which has been sent off to analyse. Until they know what culture that is and treat it, we know no more. You have been very restless and your blood saturation has been low again. Written in retrospect; from the information, we later received from Papworth Hospital, the intensive care unit indicated there was evidence of Coagulase negative staphylococcus on the tip of your central line which had been in 10 days.

Papworth Hospital also noted you had Bilateral Pulmonary Embolisms.  All your notes are being written up so I will be able to show you all this one day and we can talk about it.

Rest now Dad xx

You will notice from Jessica’s picture she has my Dad’s cross on her blanket. This was retained by my Father who was captured on the island of Leros. During the second world war, he kept this cross given to him by an Italian woman in Greece. Throughout this day Jessica’s Mother and I grew increasingly concerned about Jessica’s breathing. She appeared to be struggling to breathe and was gasping for breath.

Sometime during the afternoon, the respirator equipment was changed. There were no explanations why but Jessica seemed to be in some distress. The intensivist in critical care seemed agitated by our questions and we couldn’t feel, “all was not well.”